KHÔRA:
John David O’Brien, Rebecca Ripple, Coleen Sterritt

March 19, 2018

Hardcover
115 pages
7.5 x 9.25 inches
70 Illustrations

ISBN: 978-0-9993153-2-3

$39.95

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What is meant when using khôra to describe this exhibition, a Platonic concept that explains the space in which ideas exist? In this exhibition space is formed and agitated by the objects, shifting between imagination and reality, the tactile reality of our everyday life re-formed as a fantasy. It is a game that plays with perception. The artists compete with reality by using reality to trigger a new meaning or response as reality ignites each individual’s association with the module that has been created as a new entity. Khôra tickles our sense of, perception of, and association with that object, as if we are on a carousel: with each turn we return to the same place but we are always moving, there is a foundation that remains stable but our understanding of that foundation continues to change with each pass. Sense, perception, and association; these three phases of experience, varying from individual to individual, can be highly subjective. It is individuals’ response to this transformation that takes them through the experience of everyday perceptual genres to what becomes a game of play through imagination.

Khôra orchestrates different forms of materialized fantasy from three different minds in the same space, in order to create a new perception. These artists take common, recognizable objects from our everyday life and put them in a different context; they take familiar perception and twist it into a different universe, a tactile fantasy. The audience is looking at a real creation, but the composition of it removes the object from what it once was. As a painter I know that when the audience looks at a painting they know it is a complete myth. But when this myth becomes three-dimensional in the space and viewers become surrounded by it, all of their senses are alerted by it. It is a fantasy they can interact with, one which pushes them to reexamine reality. It makes the audience want to identify what is being seen, but the transformation is ongoing: there is no one way to look at this exhibition. The artists’ interaction is a compound concept of storytelling, philosophy, and fantasy. The objects move out of personal perception and become exclusive and esoteric.

The exhibition essay by Christopher Miles gives incredible insight into each artist’s work and opens the possibility for the audience to create its own interpretations of it. I hope the interviews with the three artists will provide a different dimension as well. It has been a pleasure to work with Coleen, John, and Rebecca, as I have known these artists as colleagues for decades.

Fatemeh Burnes
Los Angeles 2017